History, Literature, Poetry

“A damsel with a dulcimer”

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round; And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here… Continue reading “A damsel with a dulcimer”

Animals, History, Literature

It’s National “Hug A Rat Catcher Day!”

Well, not really. While July 22 is celebrated as Rat Catcher’s Day in the United States and a few other countries, it’s not a festivity that has really caught on, and good luck finding a celebratory acknowledgement to send to your friend in the greeting card section of your local supermarket. As far as I… Continue reading It’s National “Hug A Rat Catcher Day!”

History, Music, Science

Musical Interlude: Telstar

Today, July 10, 2021, is the fifty-ninth anniversary of the launching of Telstar 1, a 170lb communications satellite launched for the purpose of receiving ground signals and re-transmitting them back to earth.  According to britannica.com: Following Telstar’s launch on July 10, 1962, a giant movable horn antenna near Andover, Maine, locked onto the satellite when… Continue reading Musical Interlude: Telstar

Biography, Book Review, Guest Post, History

Book Review by Seawriter: The Rise of the Conquistador

The European discovery of the Americas and the subsequent colonization of that land by Europeans was the most consequential occurrence of the last millennia.  Two men prominent in that discovery’s opening events were Christopher Columbus and Hernando Cortés. Sword of Empire: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas from Columbus to Cortés, 1492-1529, by Donald E.… Continue reading Book Review by Seawriter: The Rise of the Conquistador

Education, History, Politics, Quote of the Day

Regarding Stories

"If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” — Rudyard Kipling In the days before it was fashionable for entire generations of people to believe that the world came into being on the day that they were born, and ended on the day that they died, and that it… Continue reading Regarding Stories

Culture, History, Medieval, Quote of the Day

Chivalry as “Art” Rather Than “Nature”

The medieval ideal brought together two things which have no natural tendency to gravitate towards one another.  It brought them together for that very reason.  It taught humility and forbearance to the great warrior because everyone knew by experience how much he usually needed that lesson.  It demanded valour of the urbane and modest man… Continue reading Chivalry as “Art” Rather Than “Nature”

Book Review, Guest Post, History

Book Review By Seawriter: From The River To The Sea–A Tale of a Real Shooting Railroad War

Railroad rivalries played a significant role in nineteenth-century US history. No rivalry was as intense or bitter as the one between the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe, and the Denver and Rio Grande railroads.  At times it erupted into actual gunfire. From the River to the Sea: The Untold Story of the Railroad War That… Continue reading Book Review By Seawriter: From The River To The Sea–A Tale of a Real Shooting Railroad War

Family, History, War

Auntie Pat Weighs In On the 75th Anniversary of Operation Overlord–Two Years On

This post is two years old--from June 6, 2019, but the sentiments, and the gratitude, to all those who served in the Allied armed forces, and to all those who endured the "miserable slog" on the home front--never grow old.  Thank you. (Auntie Pat will be 98 years old next month; may she live forever.)… Continue reading Auntie Pat Weighs In On the 75th Anniversary of Operation Overlord–Two Years On

Book Review, Guest Post, History, Science

Book Review By Seawriter: To the Uttermost Depths and Back

During the decades humans first reached outer space, they were also reaching for the ocean’s uttermost depths.  They even managed to reach those depths before placing a man in orbit. Opening the Great Depths: The Bathyscaph Trieste and Pioneers of Undersea Exploration, by Norman Polmar and Lee J. Mathers tells that story.  It is a… Continue reading Book Review By Seawriter: To the Uttermost Depths and Back