Culture, History, Military, Philosophy

On Giving and Receiving Credit–For Those Brave Enough To Try

The wise person acts but does not take credit. Leads, but does not rule--Lao Tze, Tao Te Ching and The Master, by residing in the Tao, sets an example for all beings. Because he doesn't display himself, people can see his light. Because he has nothing to prove, people can trust his words. Because he… Continue reading On Giving and Receiving Credit–For Those Brave Enough To Try

Culture, History, Rural Living

Washington, PA, the First City Named For the First President

It’s hard for me to think of a particular place as my hometown: I was born in Birmingham, England, one fall night in 1954. I was raised in Northern Nigeria, and Kaduna, Kano and Sokoto are dear to my heart. I lived in Boston for a year when my family came to the States. I… Continue reading Washington, PA, the First City Named For the First President

Biography, History, Plain Speaking

I’m Speechless…

…well, not really.  This is me, after all.  But following along in the vein of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, who made the same announcement during the worst of the debacle at Kabul’s Hamid Karzai International Airport, and then followed it with several hundred more of their words, here–with the hope that I’m more… Continue reading I’m Speechless…

Culture, Family, History, Plain Speaking

On Reality, Fear, and Projection

O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us! It wad frae mony a blunder free us, An' foolish notion Ah!  The sainted Rabbie Burns.  Scotland's national poet.  Romantic to the end.  Socialist.  Raconteur.  A man who dropped his seed wherever he felt like it, upon whichever woman struck… Continue reading On Reality, Fear, and Projection

History, Patriot, Plain Speaking, Politics, Quote of the Day

September 10, 2001

And I’m just saying, you know, if I were Osama bin Laden–he’s a very smart guy, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about him–and I nearly got him once.  I nearly got him.  And I could have killed him, but I would have to destroy a little town called Kandahar in Afghanistan and kill… Continue reading September 10, 2001

Book Review, Guest Post, History

Book Review by Seawriter: A Double Game with Double Agents

In 2010, the FBI rolled up a network of Russian spies living illegally and undercover in the United States. Press coverage focused on one spy captured, the exceedingly attractive Anna Chapman and they portrayed the illegals as a gang of inept klutzes, caught through their own carelessness. Spy Swap: The Humiliation of Russia’s Intelligence Services,… Continue reading Book Review by Seawriter: A Double Game with Double Agents

Family, History, Military

A Book Recommendation–From Sapper to Spitfire Spy–And Some Notes on Diving For Pearls

I am inspired by Seawriter's recent review of a biography of Major Donald J. Humphrey, written by Humphrey's son, to brush-up and re-post this jaunt down memory lane from early last year: From Sapper to Spitfire Spy: The WWII Biography of David Greville-Heygate DFC, by Sally-Anne Greville-Heygate is an endearing memoir of a father’s military… Continue reading A Book Recommendation–From Sapper to Spitfire Spy–And Some Notes on Diving For Pearls

Education, Family, History, Love

Quote of the Day: Why is History Important?

It is beneficial that the next generation learns about the past for the same reasons that it is important that you remember your childhood.  The quintessential question of “what next!”  How will we as a society go into the future without knowledge of the past? If we don’t know what we, as Americans, are, how… Continue reading Quote of the Day: Why is History Important?

Culture, Feminism, History

Whatever Happened to the Afghan Girl?

Remember her?  I do.  It was 1985.  Mr. Right and I were still in Pittsburgh, and had not yet moved out to the country.  I was working for MCI Mail.  And I still eagerly awaited the monthly delivery of National Geographic in my mailbox.  It wasn't woke.  It didn't lecture.  And every month, it contained… Continue reading Whatever Happened to the Afghan Girl?

Culture, History, Politics, Quote of the Day

The House of Delusion

Dateline, The English Midlands, January 2002:  Even as I write this last chapter, a thirty-five year old mother of five has been put under sentence of death by stoning in Sokoto, because two years after she was divorced by her husband, she gave birth to a baby daughter.  Had she sought to remarry, she would… Continue reading The House of Delusion