Family, History

Gagara Yasin

The year was 1956. I knew something was horribly wrong that night, when Ahmadu dropped the soup! Normally exquisitely self-possessed, immaculately groomed, and imperturbable, our man-servant and friend was disheveled, the color of cement, and shaking like a leaf with acute anxiety and palpable fear. Our little family—myself, Kay, and our imperious eighteen-month-old daughter, known… Continue reading Gagara Yasin

Culture, History, Love, Quote of the Day

“Just stick me in the back of a Land Rover and drive me to Windsor”

And today, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Member of the Order of Merit, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order upon whom had been conferred the Royal… Continue reading “Just stick me in the back of a Land Rover and drive me to Windsor”

Culture, Family Matters, History, Literature, Medieval, Womanly Feminism

On Household Relations and the Natural Order of Things

There have been so many posts on the Internet lately, and many more over time, about relations and dynamics between the sexes, the state of Western Civilization, the role of men and women in it, and how soon the handcart we’re all bouncing around in will reach the gates of Hell (not long, FYI), that… Continue reading On Household Relations and the Natural Order of Things

Cooking, Food and Drink, History

Food And Drink Post: “One a penny, two a penny…”

Hot Cross Buns! A Good Friday tradition I don’t always adhere to but which, for many reasons, this year I thought I should. Blessings and a joyous Easter season to all Christians, a Happy Passover holiday to all of the Jewish faith, and best wishes for the happiness, safety, and health of absolutely everyone. Legend… Continue reading Food And Drink Post: “One a penny, two a penny…”

History, Literature, Quote of the Day

“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool”

The quote in the title is from As You Like It, but that’s not really the Quote of the Day. April Fool! Today’s actual quote of the day comes from Charles Lamb, who was born in 1775, in London, to a middle-class lawyer’s clerk and his wife, in a house in which he lived in an… Continue reading “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool”

Family Matters, History, War

‘Sweet and Fitting,’ or ‘Unworthy’ and ‘Distasteful?’ Wilfred Owen vs William Butler Yeats

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, beloved son, accomplished poet, and soldier of The Great War, was born 128 years ago, on March 18, 1893 in Oswestry, a Welsh border town, in the county of Shropshire.  Readers of Ellis Peters's Brother Cadfael chronicles, or of her Welsh historical quartet (written under her real name of Edith Pargeter)… Continue reading ‘Sweet and Fitting,’ or ‘Unworthy’ and ‘Distasteful?’ Wilfred Owen vs William Butler Yeats

Culture, Family, History

JANGALI, 1947

EVERY YEAR, about October/November a cattle tax of one-shilling-a-head was levied on every bull, steer, cow or calf throughout all the cattle-holding provinces of Northern Nigeria. This was in accordance with the principle that in order to establish sovereignty of the Crown, every adult in the territory had to pay an appropriate yearly tax to… Continue reading JANGALI, 1947

History, Literature, Medieval

An Unlikely Troubadour; An Unexpected Gift

Thomas Mallare, of Newbold Revel in the County of Warwickshire, died 550 years ago on March 14, 1471. He was born fifty-six years before that, with a bit of a silver spoon in his mouth, to a Midlands Justice of the Peace and his heiress wife. Mallare had an uneventful childhood, was knighted in 1441… Continue reading An Unlikely Troubadour; An Unexpected Gift